Equally yoked dating service

As many times as we’ve heard and seen this narrative, I should be numb to it. However, you might be interested to know that we observed this to be very clear and a specific trend, not only in our matchmaking attempts in Atlanta for season 3, but also in both season 1 and season 2 in the New York area.

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With no time to smell the roses or to wonder at the beauties that surround them, they become strangers in the world they live in.

Why do we wine and dine and romance our women if we have no intention of marrying them?

Within the last eighteen months I have attended nine welcoming parties.

These are parties by friends and acquaintances who went to Africa, marry and successfully petitioned for their wives to come to the United States.

In the US at least, one could petition for his future wife by way of the Fiancé Visa provision or through outright marriage which could take upward of twenty months. But why do African men go though this tortuous and circuitous immigration process? Though the preceding assertion is not empirically grounded, one can not but notice that “greenhorn marriages” dissolve quicker — mostly within five years with or without offspring.

Why do African men go home to marry instead of marrying the women they’ve wined and dined and romanced right here in the US. More often than not most of these marriages are not based on love or affection.

In case you’re unfamiliar with the premise of the show, a man and a woman who have been matched by a panel of experts, marry each other “at first sight.” Meaning, they meet and marry their spouse on the same day.

The couple move in and live as husband and wife for 90 days before they have to make the decision to either stay married or get a divorce.

Why do we whine and complain when we see them lay their eggs in the nest of other races?

Why do we sneer at them when they turn the “ideal age for marriage” and are unmarried?

Be it in Houston, Seattle, Dallas, Miami, New York and everywhere in between, African nurses abound.

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